Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Jason B. Ladd E-course Review, Book Review Banzai

The course is two hours, and 50 minutes long. It has 11 modules (with some having additional parts) in total ranging from five to ten minutes each with the exception of some being a bit shorter, or longer. Module one begins with the course creator talking, and then launches into some pics, and how-tos. The tempo is a little fast. He is a speed-talker here. Jason gives out different info that isn't found all over the web. It is repetitious with the word "this". It's presented on parchment looking paper on a black background. All caps is used. It uses serif typography. There are headings. He is consistent throughout with the parchment paper, and black background. The text is light, and dark brown. The lessons are delivered in bite-size pieces. It is well-organized. It has a catchy name because it has onomatopoeia. It's short and easy to remember. The reception is good. His voice is smooth, and clear. There is no background noise. It doesn’t cut out. It doesn’t echo. Going further into the lessons, there are charts, demos, templates, tips, pics, and more. I learned three and a half pages of info. The videos were short and sweet. The course was well presented overall. I would pay about $200.00 for this course. The course is two hours, and 50 minutes long. It has 11 modules (with some having additional parts) in total ranging from five to ten minutes each with the exception of some being a bit shorter, or longer. Module one begins with the course creator talking, and then launches into some pics, and how-tos. The tempo is a little fast. He is a speed-talker here. Jason gives out different info that isn't found all over the web. It is repetitious with the word "this". It's presented on parchment looking paper on a black background. All caps is used. It uses serif typography. There are headings. He is consistent throughout with the parchment paper, and black background. The text is light, and dark brown. The lessons are delivered in bite-size pieces. It is well-organized. It has a catchy name because it has onomatopoeia. It's short and easy to remember. The reception is good. His voice is smooth, and clear. There is no background noise. It doesn’t cut out. It doesn’t echo. Going further into the lessons, there are charts, demos, templates, tips, pics, and more. I learned three and a half pages of info. The videos were short and sweet. The course was well presented overall. I would pay about $200.00 for this course.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Book Review: Emily's Day In The Desert By Giselle Shardlow

Author: Giselle Shardlow Illustrator: Vicky Bowes Pgs. 48 Genre: Children's Ages: 4-7 Title: Emily's Day In The Desert: The desert may be a dry, hot, almost barren piece of land, but the cover to Giselle Shardlow's new book "Emily's Day In The Desert" shows a bit different scene in where a child is quite happily demonstrating a yoga pose. Three animals are shown who seem to be interested in what the child is doing. The sun is peeking just behind the mountains. Vegetation lingers, and rocks are scattered about. The colours used to illustrate the cover blend between light, and dark while the majority of colour used is a brown sandy colour. The illustrations are simple in design. The story is set in Death Valley. It begins by mother and daughter standing in the desert with a lesson taught by the mother. The family members venture on to have breakfast together, and meet some animals along the way. The little girl's enthusiasm, and eagerness is quite apparent. Travel is on foot, and by jeep. Emily carries around a journal with her checking things off on her list. With all her heart there is one thing she wishes to see the most! The little girl takes photos to remind her of the adventure. The story wraps up in the evening with the family resting. Emily's Day In The Desert encompasses subjects such as science, geography, movement, visualization, imagination, photography, animals, and air pollution. Yoga poses vary from the Cat Pose to the Pigeon Pose. Kids are able to identify with the characters. It is meant for the 4-7 year old group. Short sentences, and simple language make up the structure. I recommend this book to kids, parents, yoga lovers, teachers, doctors, groups, classrooms, libraries, and music/dance studios. My favourite part of the book is all the diverse animals. They are not your ordinary animals. The book comes with instructions, and a parent-teacher guide. The book is informative, and educational, and has many great themes. Ratings: Cover: 5 Storyline: 5 Illustrations: 5 Unity And Originality: 5

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

The Magnificent Manifesto

A manifesto is composed of either an individual or a groups clear motives, views, or intentions. The manifesto is usually made public, or has appeared in published form. It contains three essential parts: the beliefs, the goals, and the wisdom. Many types of manifestos exist from artists to writers. Here are some examples of good manifestos: http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/10-awesome-inspirational-manifestos.html http://www.buzzfeed.com/monicatan/11-manifestos-that-could-change-your-art-life-ehq1#.qqoA0W7oK http://www.chowhound.com/manifesto https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/02/art-manifestos-and-their-applications-in-contemporary-design/ I will be posting my manifesto at a later date on this blog.

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Good Reading

Here is a link to some good reading material, a good author, and a good contest for today. http://www.ebbrown.net/march-fiction “There is no friend as loyal as a book.” ~Ernest Hemingway~ “What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet or excite you. Books help us understand who we are and how we are to behave. They show us what community and friendship mean; they show us how to live and die.” ~Anne Lamott~ Enjoy! :)

Saturday, February 27, 2016

Haiku

Island drapery dissolving purple-stained sky. Coloured sensuous tales wake. Copyright Michelle Kafka

Saturday, January 1, 2011

Happy New Year!


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Friday, December 10, 2010

Surprising snippets from Read-it-first

If you love reading then be sure to read the following useful information:

Read-it-first is a practical program wherein you get to "try before you buy." Books that is. How? St. Martin's Press offers Read-it-first with the editor Suzanne Beecher delivering a sizzling new "in bookstores now" or a pre-released title straight to your email address every Monday morning. Throughout the week you are guaranteed to receive a few more chapters of the title. Then you decide whether to pass on or to purchase the entire book wherever it is you buy your books from. Furthermore, Suzanne begins with "Dear Reader," and then she launches into a personal anecdote. The free read follows. For example, this week the book is "The Christmas Journey" by Donna Van Liere. Additionally you can take a look at some stats on Read-it-first at http://www.trendscape.com/site/read-it-first.com

In fact what are the benefits of this reading program?

It is easy
It is free
It is a time-saver
It is a great email book club
It is concentrated as there is only one title to read per week
Sometimes the titles correspond with the holidays
There are no annoying ads or popups as with some free read websites so you get good clean reads in your inbox
There are a variety of genres delivered to you
You can store the reads in your own Read-it-first folder
You can discover new authors with new stories to tell
You can also enter the contests to win delightful novels

"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." ~Chinese Proverb~

Really. Who does not like to sample products or services before a purchase?

Now if you are in pursuit of something to read with your coffee, tea, or hot chocolate, or if you need a good quite read while kids nap, or you have at least five extra minutes to spare then I urge you to sign up at Read-it-first.

Read-it-first receives nine bookmarks in my books!

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Make Your Writer Statement Shine

There are many ways to structure the general writer statement and many things to include in such a statement. You can begin by offering a literary quote, a memoir, an example, a statistic, an anecdote, etc. The writer statement answers questions; it responds to questions of past, present, and future. It is your statement. It is a definition. It is a personal choice. In addition, choose a focus and set up a foundation for your statement. Write about your experiences. Give information that tells the reader something. Give something more than just common knowledge. Make it unique. Make it you. Show your passion by showing emotion. Give some depth. Use correct grammar and “show don’t tell”. Use sensory details like how the pen feels when you are writing. Last, what is important to you in your writing? What are your writing goals?

If you cannot think of anything to write here are some questions to get you motivated:

How did you develop your writing?
What will you be writing?
Who do you or would you like to write like?
Where is your favourite place to write?
What do you use as writing instruments – pen and paper, typewriter, mobile phone, etc?
How is today’s writing going to shape your future?
Do you write fiction or non-fiction?
What is the one best piece of writing advice you have received or given?
How has your writing changed you or the world?
Why writing and say not landscaping or something else?
Do you have or believe you need a writing degree, certificate, diploma, etc.?
Do you belong to any writing groups, clubs, or organizations?

Moreover, the point of your writer statement is to help yourself and people understand why you do what it is you do. To share your thoughts and feelings on your writing journey is another reason why one should write a writer statement and make it shine. For each piece of writing you can compose a writer statement for that particular writing project.

More questions as follows:

Do you have a favourite or frequent word that keeps appearing in your work?
If you could be any writer from the past for one day who would you want to be and why?
Do you enjoy word puzzles, games, trivia, etc.?
What are some of your favourite writing movies?
Were your parents or anyone else in the family writers?
What are you writing now?
What fuels or inspires your writing?
What writing books, sites, courses are you currently reading/studying?
When is your favourite time to write?
What is your writing style?
What is your favourite writing device?
What is your favourite writing quote or proverb?
How long have you been writing?
What are your favourite writing snacks?

Finally, the writer statement can be written in the present tense as if you have achieved all that you desired. The length of your statement does not matter. If you wish to make it two sentences or two pages – go ahead. Also remember at any time you can change your writer statement. Check back with it in a month, or quarterly. Review your answers and alter if necessary as you achieve, achieve, achieve!

Further resources on the writer statement:

"A WRITER'S STATEMENT--WRITING WHAT MATTERS"

"Writer's Statement - the shortish version"

Resources on the personal mission statement:

"What Is a Personal Mission Statement?"

"The Five-Step Plan for Creating Personal Mission Statements"

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Bridge Kiss Memory

Bridge Kiss Memory

Rousing in bed
Gold moonlight oozing over me
Dissolving sleep
Transcending memory…

Emerald fingers tickle lively bare toes.
Grey ladybugs sit up proud in the stream.
From three lanterns soft, plump light choruses, while
the mist struts and shakes embellishing its role.

With a hint of mint and jasmine beneath the rainbow upon the stone bridge
our hearts salsa while our lips tango –
my first kiss with you!

Copyright July 2010 Michelle Kafka

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Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Happy Saint Patrick's Day!

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